JMIR Medical Education

Technology, innovation, and openness in medical education in the information age.

Editor-in-Chief:

Blake J. Lesselroth, MD MBI FACP FAMIA, University of Oklahoma | OU-Tulsa Schusterman Center; University of Victoria, British Columbia


Impact Factor 3.6

JMIR Medical Education (JME, ISSN: 2369-3762, Impact Factor 3.6) is an open access, PubMed-indexed, peer-reviewed journal focusing on technology, innovation, and openness in medical education.This includes e-learning and virtual training, which has gained critical relevance in the (post-)COVID world. Another focus is on how to train health professionals to use digital tools. We publish original research, reviews, viewpoint, and policy papers on innovation and technology in medical education. As an open access journal, we have a special interest in open and free tools and digital learning objects for medical education and urge authors to make their tools and learning objects freely available (we may also publish them as a Multimedia Appendix). We also invite submissions of non-conventional articles (e.g., open medical education material and software resources that are not yet evaluated but free for others to use/implement). 

In our "Students' Corner," we invite students and trainees from various health professions to submit short essays and viewpoints on all aspects of medical education, particularly suggestions on improving medical education and suggestions for new technologies, applications, and approaches. 

In 2023, JMIR Medical Education received an inaugural Journal Impact Factor™ of 3.6 (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2023). The journal is indexed in MEDLINE, PubMed, PubMed Central, Scopus, DOAJ, and the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate).

Recent Articles

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Mobile Approaches to Medical Education

Carers often assume key roles in cancer care. However, many carers report feeling disempowered and ill‐equipped to support patients. Our group published evidence-based guidelines (the Triadic Oncology [TRIO] Guidelines) to improve oncology clinician engagement with carers and the management of challenging situations involving carers.

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Reviews in Medical Education

During health crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic, shortages of health care workers often occur. Recruiting students as volunteers could be an option, but it is uncertain whether the idea is well-accepted.

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Viewpoint and Opinions on Innovation in Medical Education

Despite the increasing relevance of statistics in health sciences, teaching styles in higher education are remarkably similar across disciplines: lectures covering the theory and methods, followed by application and computer exercises in given data sets. This often leads to challenges for students in comprehending fundamental statistical concepts essential for medical research. To address these challenges, we propose an engaging learning approach—DICE (design, interpret, compute, estimate)—aimed at enhancing the learning experience of statistics in public health and epidemiology. In introducing DICE, we guide readers through a practical example. Students will work in small groups to plan, generate, analyze, interpret, and communicate their own scientific investigation with simulations. With a focus on fundamental statistical concepts such as sampling variability, error probabilities, and the construction of statistical models, DICE offers a promising approach to learning how to combine substantive medical knowledge and statistical concepts. The materials in this paper, including the computer code, can be readily used as a hands-on tool for both teachers and students.

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Medical Education

ChatGPT (OpenAI), a cutting-edge natural language processing model, holds immense promise for revolutionizing medical education. With its remarkable performance in language-related tasks, ChatGPT offers personalized and efficient learning experiences for medical students and doctors. Through training, it enhances clinical reasoning and decision-making skills, leading to improved case analysis and diagnosis. The model facilitates simulated dialogues, intelligent tutoring, and automated question-answering, enabling the practical application of medical knowledge. However, integrating ChatGPT into medical education raises ethical and legal concerns. Safeguarding patient data and adhering to data protection regulations are critical. Transparent communication with students, physicians, and patients is essential to ensure their understanding of the technology’s purpose and implications, as well as the potential risks and benefits. Maintaining a balance between personalized learning and face-to-face interactions is crucial to avoid hindering critical thinking and communication skills. Despite challenges, ChatGPT offers transformative opportunities. Integrating it with problem-based learning, team-based learning, and case-based learning methodologies can further enhance medical education. With proper regulation and supervision, ChatGPT can contribute to a well-rounded learning environment, nurturing skilled and knowledgeable medical professionals ready to tackle health care challenges. By emphasizing ethical considerations and human-centric approaches, ChatGPT’s potential can be fully harnessed in medical education, benefiting both students and patients alike.

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Medical Education

Medical history contributes approximately 80% to the diagnosis, although physical examinations and laboratory investigations increase a physician’s confidence in the medical diagnosis. The concept of artificial intelligence (AI) was first proposed more than 70 years ago. Recently, its role in various fields of medicine has grown remarkably. However, no studies have evaluated the importance of patient history in AI-assisted medical diagnosis.

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Research Letter

This study describes the development of an electronic portfolio (e-Portfolio) designed to collect and record the overall academic performance throughout the educational journey of medical students, as well as to support narrative of lived experiences and reflections to be shared among students and their mentors.

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Preliminary Experiences with New Educational Technology

Undergraduate medical studies represent a panoply of learning opportunities served in the form of various teaching-learning modalities for medical learners. A clinical scenario is frequently employed as a modality, followed by multiple choice and open-ended questions among other learning and teaching methods. As such, script-concordance tests (SCT) can be used to promote higher level of clinical reasoning. Recent technological developments have made generative artificial intelligence-based systems like ChatGPT available to assist clinician-educators in creating instructional materials.

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Evaluation of Medical Education

Substance use and overdose deaths make up a substantial portion of injury-related deaths in the United States, with the state of Ohio leading the nation in rates of diagnosed substance use disorder (SUD). Ohio’s growing epidemic has indicated a need to improve SUD care in a primary care setting through the engagement of multidisciplinary providers and the use of a comprehensive approach to care.

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Reviews in Medical Education

Digital competence is listed as one of the key competences for lifelong learning and is increasing in importance not only in private life but also in professional life. There is consensus within the health care sector that digital competence (or digital literacy) is needed in various professional fields. However, it is still unclear what exactly the digital competence of health professionals should include and how it can be measured.

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Medical Education

Artificial intelligence models can learn from medical literature and clinical cases and generate answers that rival human experts. However, challenges remain in the analysis of complex data containing images and diagrams.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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