JMIR Medical Education

Technology, innovation, and openness in medical education in the information age


JMIR Medical Education (JME) is an open access, peer-reviewed journal with a focus on technology, innovation and openess in medical education. This includes e-learning and virtual training, which in the (post-)COVID world has gained critical relevance. The journal is also interested in the training of health professionals in the usage of digital tools. We publish original research, reviews, viewpoint and policy papers on innovation and technology in medical education. As an open access journal, we have special interest in open and free tools and digitial learning objects for medical education, and urge authors to make their tools and learning objects freely available (we may also publish them as a Multimedia Appendix). We also invite submissions of non-conventional articles (eg, open medical education material and software resources that are not yet evaluated but free for others to use/implement). 

In our "Students' Corner", we invite students and trainees from various health professions to submit short essays and viewpoints on all aspects of medical education. In particular, we welcome suggestions on how to improve medical education, new technologies, applications and approaches. There are currently no article processing fees for papers accepted for "Students' Corner". 

JMIR Medical Education is indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central, DOAJ, and Scopus.

Recent Articles

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Graduate and Postgraduate Education for Health Professionals

Residents receive a numeric performance rating (eg, 1-7 scoring scale) along with a narrative (ie, qualitative) feedback based on their performance in each workplace-based assessment (WBA). Aggregated qualitative data from WBA can be overwhelming to process and fairly adjudicate as part of a global decision about learner competence. Current approaches with qualitative data require a human rater to maintain attention and appropriately weigh various data inputs within the constraints of working memory before rendering a global judgment of performance.

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Undergraduate Education for Future Doctors

The benefits of near-peer learning are well established in several aspects of undergraduate medical education including preparing students for Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs). The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a paradigm shift to predominantly online teaching.

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Reviews in Medical Education

Anatomy has been the cornerstone of medical education for centuries. However, given the advances in the Internet of Things, this landscape has been augmented in the past decade, shifting toward a greater focus on adopting digital technologies. Digital anatomy is emerging as a new discipline that represents an opportunity to embrace advances in digital health technologies and apply them to the domain of modern medical sciences. Notably, the use of augmented or mixed and virtual reality as well as mobile and platforms and 3D printing in modern anatomy has dramatically increased in the last 5 years.

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Simulation

Bedside teaching is integral to medical education and has been highlighted to improve clinical and communication skills, as well as clinical reasoning. Despite the significant advantages of bedside teaching, its usage within medical education has been declining, and COVID-19 has added additional challenges. The pandemic has resulted in a significant reduction in opportunities to deliver bedside teaching due to risk of viral exposure, patients declining student interactions, and ward closures. Educators have therefore been required to be innovative in their teaching methods, leading to the use of online learning, social media platforms, and simulation. Simulation-based education allows for learning in a low-risk environment and affords the opportunity for deliberated repeated practice with case standardization. The results demonstrate that simulation-based training can increase students’ confidence, increase the rates of correct clinical diagnoses, and improve retention of skills and knowledge when compared with traditional teaching methods.

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Reviews in Medical Education

Continuing professional development (CPD) is essential for physicians to maintain and enhance their knowledge, competence, skills, and performance. Web-based CPD plays an essential role. However, validated theory–informed measures of their impact are lacking. The CPD-REACTION questionnaire is a validated theory–informed tool that evaluates the impact of CPD activities on clinicians’ behavioral intentions.

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Preliminary Experiences with New Educational Technology

The global market for medical education is projected to increase exponentially over the next 5 years. A mode of delivery expected to drive the growth of this market is virtual reality (VR). VR simulates real-world objects, events, locations, and interactions in 3D multimedia sensory environments. It has been used successfully in medical education for surgical training, learning anatomy, and advancing drug discovery. New VR research has been used to simulate role-playing and clinical encounters; however, most of this research has been conducted with health professions students and not current health care professionals. Thus, more research is needed to explore how health care professionals experience VR with role-playing and clinical encounters.

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Simulation

Residents may benefit from simulated practice with personalized feedback to prepare for high-stakes disclosure conversations with patients after harmful errors and to meet American Council on Graduate Medical Education mandates. Ideally, feedback would come from patients who have experienced communication after medical harm, but medical researchers and leaders have found it difficult to reach this community, which has made this approach impractical at scale. The Video-Based Communication Assessment app is designed to engage crowdsourced laypeople to rate physician communication skills but has not been evaluated for use with medical harm scenarios.

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Mobile Approaches to Medical Education

The digital age has introduced opportunities and challenges for clinical education and practice caused by infinite incoming information and novel technologies for health. In the interdisciplinary field of communication sciences and disorders (CSD), engagement with digital topics has emerged slower than in other health fields, and effective strategies for accessing, managing, and focusing on digital resources are greatly needed.

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Health Professionals' Training in eHealth, Digital Medicine, Medical Informatics

Strengthening the national health information system is one of Ethiopia’s priority transformation agendas. A well-trained and competent workforce is the essential ingredient to a strong health information system. However, this workforce has neither been quantified nor characterized well, and there is no roadmap of required human resources to enhance the national health information system.

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Undergraduate Education for Future Doctors

Similar to understanding how blood pressure is measured by a sphygmomanometer, physicians will soon have to understand how an artificial intelligence–based application has come to the conclusion that a patient has hypertension, diabetes, or cancer. Although there are an increasing number of use cases where artificial intelligence is or can be applied to improve medical outcomes, the extent to which medical doctors and students are ready to work and leverage this paradigm is unclear.

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Student/Learners Perceptions and Experiences with Educational Technology

Clinical workplace learning takes place in a dynamic and complex learning environment that is designated as a site for patient care and education. Challenges in clinical training can be overcome by implementing blended learning, as it offers flexible learning programs suitable for student-centered learning, web-based collaboration, and peer learning.

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Continuing Medical Education (CME) for Doctors

Females make up more than half of medical school matriculants but only one-third of emergency medicine (EM) residents. Various factors may contribute to why fewer females choose the field of EM, such as the existing presence of females in the specialty.

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