JMIR Medical Education

Technology, innovation, and openness in medical education in the information age

Editor-in-Chief:

Nabil Zary, MD, PhD, Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Science, Dubai, UAE


Impact Factor 2023

JMIR Medical Education (JME) is an open access, peer-reviewed journal with a focus on technology, innovation and openess in medical education. This includes e-learning and virtual training, which in the (post-)COVID world has gained critical relevance. The journal is also interested in the training of health professionals in the usage of digital tools. We publish original research, reviews, viewpoint and policy papers on innovation and technology in medical education. As an open access journal, we have special interest in open and free tools and digitial learning objects for medical education, and urge authors to make their tools and learning objects freely available (we may also publish them as a Multimedia Appendix). We also invite submissions of non-conventional articles (eg, open medical education material and software resources that are not yet evaluated but free for others to use/implement). 

In our "Students' Corner", we invite students and trainees from various health professions to submit short essays and viewpoints on all aspects of medical education. In particular, we welcome suggestions on how to improve medical education, new technologies, applications and approaches. There are currently no article processing fees for papers accepted for "Students' Corner". 

JMIR Medical Education is indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central, DOAJ, Scopus, and the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate).

Recent Articles

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Preliminary Experiences with New Educational Technology

US residents require practice and feedback to meet Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education mandates and patient expectations for effective communication after harmful errors. Current instructional approaches rely heavily on lectures, rarely provide individualized feedback to residents about communication skills, and may not assure that residents acquire the skills desired by patients. The Video-based Communication Assessment (VCA) app is a novel tool for simulating communication scenarios for practice and obtaining crowdsourced assessments and feedback on physicians’ communication skills. We previously established that crowdsourced laypeople can reliably assess residents’ error disclosure skills with the VCA app. However, its efficacy for error disclosure training has not been tested.

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Training Tools for Medical Students

There are gaps in knowledge translation (KT) of current evidence-based practices regarding stroke assessment and rehabilitation delivered through teletherapy. A lack of this knowledge can prevent occupational therapy (OT) students and practitioners from implementing current research findings.

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Social Media in Medical Education

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted medical education, shifting learning online. Social media platforms, including messaging apps, are well integrated into medical education. However, Telegram’s role in medical education remains relatively unexplored.

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Students' Corner

With the advent of competency-based medical education, as well as Canadian efforts to include clinical informatics within undergraduate medical education, competency frameworks in the United States have not emphasized the skills associated with clinical informatics pertinent to the broader practice of medicine.

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Continuing Medical Education (CME) for Allied Health Professionals

eHealth is increasingly becoming an indispensable part of health practice and policy-making strategies. However, the use of eHealth tools in clinical practice and the perceptions of eHealth among medical students and health care professionals in Vietnam are not well understood.

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Medical Education in the Developing World and Resource-Poor Settings

Neonatal mortality accounts for approximately 46% of global under-5 child mortality. The widespread access to mobile devices in low- and middle-income countries has enabled innovations, such as mobile virtual reality (VR), to be leveraged in simulation education for health care workers.

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Reviews in Medical Education

Internationally, the impact of continued exposure to workplace environmental and psychological stressors on health care professionals’ mental health is associated with increased depression, substance misuse, sleep disorders, and posttraumatic stress. This can lead to staff burnout, poor quality health care, and reduced patient safety outcomes. Strategies to improve the psychological health and well-being of health care staff have been highlighted as a critical priority worldwide. The concept of resilience for health care professionals as a tool for negotiating workplace adversity has gained increasing prominence.

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Health Professionals' Training in eHealth, Digital Medicine, Medical Informatics

The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly increased telehealth usage in the United States. Patients with limited English proficiency (LEP) face barriers to health care, which may be mitigated when providers work with professional interpreters. However, telehealth may exacerbate disparities if clinicians are not trained to work with interpreters in that setting. Although medical students are now involved in telehealth on an unprecedented scale, no educational innovations have been published that focus on digital care across language barriers.

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Testing and Assessment in Medical Education

The demand for regional anesthesia for major surgery has increased considerably, but only a small number of anesthesiologists can provide such care. Simulations may improve clinical performance. However, opportunities to rehearse procedures are limited, and the clinical educational outcomes prescribed by the Royal College of Anesthesiologists training curriculum 2021 are difficult to attain. Educational paradigms, such as mastery learning and dedicated practice, are increasingly being used to teach technical skills to enhance skills acquisition. Moreover, high-fidelity, resilient cadaver simulators are now available: the soft embalmed Thiel cadaver shows physical characteristics and functional alignment similar to those of patients. Tissue elasticity allows tissues to expand and relax, fluid to drain away, and hundreds of repeated injections to be tolerated without causing damage. Learning curves and their intra- and interindividual dynamics have not hitherto been measured on the Thiel cadaver simulator using the mastery learning and dedicated practice educational paradigm coupled with validated, quantitative metrics, such as checklists, eye tracking metrics, and self-rating scores.

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Social Media in Medical Education

Social media presence among health care professionals is ubiquitous and largely beneficial for their personal and professional lives. New standards are forming in the context of e-professionalism, which are loosening the predefined older and offline terms. With these benefits also come dangers, with exposure to evaluation on all levels from peers, superiors, and the public, as witnessed in the #medbikini movement.

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Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality in Medical Education

Patient simulators are an increasingly important part of medical training. They have been shown to be effective in teaching procedural skills, medical knowledge, and clinical decision-making. Recently, virtual and augmented reality simulators are being produced, but there is no research on whether these more realistic experiences cause problematic and greater stress responses as compared to standard manikin simulators.

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Health Professionals' Training in eHealth, Digital Medicine, Medical Informatics

Health professionals in low- and middle-resource settings have limited access to up-to-date resources for diagnosing and treating illnesses, training medical staff, reviewing newly disseminated guidelines and publications, and preparing data for international disease reporting. A concomitant difficulty in high-resource settings is the need for continuing education and skills up-training in innovative procedures on unfamiliar social media platforms. These challenges can delay both patient care and epidemiological surveillance efforts. To overcome these challenges, health professionals have adapted WeChat Groups to implement timely, low-cost, and high-quality patient care.

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