JMIR Medical Education

Technology, innovation, and openness in medical education in the information age

Editor-in-Chief:

Janet Corral, PhD, Associate Dean, Curricular Affairs, Medical Student Education; Associate Professor, College of Medicine, University of Arizona - Tucson

Nabil Zary, MD, PhD, Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Science, Dubai, UAE


JMIR Medical Education (JME) is an open access, peer-reviewed journal with a focus on technology, innovation and openess in medical education. This includes e-learning and virtual training, which in the (post-)COVID world has gained critical relevance. The journal is also interested in the training of health professionals in the usage of digital tools. We publish original research, reviews, viewpoint and policy papers on innovation and technology in medical education. As an open access journal, we have special interest in open and free tools and digitial learning objects for medical education, and urge authors to make their tools and learning objects freely available (we may also publish them as a Multimedia Appendix). We also invite submissions of non-conventional articles (eg, open medical education material and software resources that are not yet evaluated but free for others to use/implement). 

In our "Students' Corner", we invite students and trainees from various health professions to submit short essays and viewpoints on all aspects of medical education. In particular, we welcome suggestions on how to improve medical education, new technologies, applications and approaches. There are currently no article processing fees for papers accepted for "Students' Corner". 

Articles published in JME are indexed in PubMed and Scopus. 

Recent Articles

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New Methods and Approaches in Medical Education

The 13 core entrustable professional activities (EPAs) are key competency-based learning outcomes in the transition from undergraduate to graduate medical education in the United States. Five of these EPAs (EPA2: prioritizing differentials, EPA3: recommending and interpreting tests, EPA4: entering orders and prescriptions, EPA5: documenting clinical encounters, and EPA10: recognizing urgent and emergent conditions) are uniquely suited for web-based assessment.

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Undergraduate Education for Future Doctors

The COVID-19 pandemic has had significant effects on anatomy education. During the pandemic, students have had no access to cadavers, which has been the principal method of learning anatomy. We created and tested a customized congenital heart disease e-learning course for medical students that contained interactive 3D models of anonymized pediatric congenital heart defects.

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Social Media in Medical Education

The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated the rapid expansion of novel tools for digital medical education. At our university medical center, an Instagram account was developed as a tool for medical education and used for the first time as a supplement to the hematology and medical oncology teaching module of 2020/2021.

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Students' Corner

With the integration of COVID-19 into our lives, the way events are organized has changed. The Cerrahpaşa Neuroscience Days held on May 8-9, 2021, was one of the conferences that was affected. The annual conference of the student-based Cerrahpaşa Neuroscience Society transitioned to the internet for the first time and had the premise of going international.

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Student/Learners Perceptions and Experiences with Educational Technology

Advances in digital health and digital learning are transforming the lives of patients, health care providers, and health professional students. In the interdisciplinary field of communication sciences and disorders (CSD), digital uptake and incorporation of digital topics and technologies into clinical training programs has lagged behind other medical fields. There is a need to understand professional and student experiences, opinions, and needs regarding digital health and learning topics so that effective strategies for implementation can be optimized.

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New Methods and Approaches in Medical Education

Medical education, research, and health care practice continue to grow with minimal coproduction guidance. We suggest the Commons Principle approach to medical education as modeled by Ostrom and Williamson, where we share how adapting these models to multiple settings can enhance empathy, increase psychological safety, and provide robust just-in-time learning tools for practice. We here describe patient and public coproduction in diverse areas within health care using the commons philosophy across populations, cultures, and generations with learning examples across age groups and cultures. We further explore descriptive, mixed methods participatory action in medical and research education. We adopt an “Everyone Included” perspective and sought to identify its use in continuing medical education, citizen science, marginalized groups, publishing, and student internships. Overall, we outline coproduction at the point of need, as we report on strategies that improved engagement. This work demonstrates coproduction with the public across multiple settings and cultures, showing that even with minimal resources and experience, this partnership can improve medical education and care.

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Training Tools for Medical Students

Teaching medical ultrasound has increased in popularity in medical schools with hands-on workshops as an essential part of teaching. However, the lockdown due to COVID-19 kept medical schools from conducting these workshops.

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Highschool and Early Career Education for Future Healthcare Professionals

Expressing empathy builds trust with patients, increases patient satisfaction, and is associated with better health outcomes. Research shows that expressing empathy to patients improves patient adherence to medications and decreases patient anxiety and the number of malpractice lawsuits. However, there is a dearth of research on teaching empathy to premedical students. The Clinical Science, Technology, and Medicine Summer Internship of Stanford Medicine (also called the Stanford Anesthesia Summer Institute) is a 2-week collaborative medical internship for high school and undergraduate students to inspire learners to be compassionate health care providers. The summer 2020 program was adapted to accomplish these objectives in a fully remote environment because of the COVID-19 global pandemic.

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Evaluation of Medical Education

The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated the adoption and implementation of digital technologies to help transform the educational ecosystem and the delivery of care.

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New Methods and Approaches in Medical Education

Virtual supervisory relationships provide an infrastructure for flexible learning, global accessibility, and outreach, connecting individuals worldwide. The surge in web-based educational activities in recent years provides an opportunity to understand the attributes of an effective supervisor-student or mentor-student relationship.

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Graduate and Postgraduate Education for Health Professionals

Websites are an important source of information for fellowship applicants, as they can influence ongoing interest and potential program selection.

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Training Tools for Medical Students

Accurate interpretation of a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) demands high levels of skill and expertise. Early training in medical school plays an important role in building the ECG interpretation skill. Thus, understanding how medical students perform the task of interpretation is important for improving this skill.

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