JMIR Medical Education

Technology, innovation, and openness in medical education in the information age.

Editor-in-Chief:

Blake J. Lesselroth, MD MBI FACP FAMIA, University of Oklahoma | OU-Tulsa Schusterman Center; University of Victoria, British Columbia


Impact Factor 3.6

JMIR Medical Education (JME, ISSN: 2369-3762, Impact Factor 3.6) is an open access, PubMed-indexed, peer-reviewed journal focusing on technology, innovation, and openness in medical education.This includes e-learning and virtual training, which has gained critical relevance in the (post-)COVID world. Another focus is on how to train health professionals to use digital tools. We publish original research, reviews, viewpoint, and policy papers on innovation and technology in medical education. As an open access journal, we have a special interest in open and free tools and digital learning objects for medical education and urge authors to make their tools and learning objects freely available (we may also publish them as a Multimedia Appendix). We also invite submissions of non-conventional articles (e.g., open medical education material and software resources that are not yet evaluated but free for others to use/implement). 

In our "Students' Corner," we invite students and trainees from various health professions to submit short essays and viewpoints on all aspects of medical education, particularly suggestions on improving medical education and suggestions for new technologies, applications, and approaches. 

In 2023, JMIR Medical Education received an inaugural Journal Impact Factor™ of 3.6 (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2023). The journal is indexed in MEDLINE, PubMed, PubMed Central, Scopus, DOAJ, and the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate).

Recent Articles

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Reviews in Medical Education

In recent years Virtual reality (VR) has gained significant importance in medical education. Radiology education also has seen the induction of VR technology. However, there is no comprehensive review in this specific area. The present review aims to fill this gap in the knowledge.

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Theme Issue [2023]: Digital Health Skills and Competencies for Clinicians and Health Care Professionals

SaNuRN is a five-year project by the University of Rouen Normandy (URN) and the Côte d’Azur University (CAU) consortium to optimize digital health education for medical and paramedical students, professionals, and administrators. The project includes a skills framework, training modules, and teaching resources. In 2027, SaNuRN is expected to train a significant portion of the 400,000 health and paramedical professions students at the French national level. Our purpose is to give a synopsis of the SaNuRN initiative, emphasizing its novel educational methods and how they will enhance the delivery of digital health education. Our goals include showcasing SaNuRN as a comprehensive program consisting of a proficiency framework, instructional modules, and educational materials and explaining how SaNuRN is implemented in the participating academic institutions. SaNuRN is a project aimed at educating and training health-related and paramedics students in digital health. The project results from a cooperative effort between URN and CAU, covering four French departments. The project is based on the French National Referential on Digital Health (FNRDH), which defines the skills and competencies to be acquired and validated by every student in the health, paramedical, and social professions curricula. The SaNuRN team is currently adapting the existing URN and CAU syllabi to FNRDH and developing short-duration video capsules of 20 to 30 minutes to teach all the relevant material. The project aims to ensure that the largest student population earns the necessary skills, and it has developed a two-tier system involving facilitators who will enable the efficient expansion of the project’s educational outreach and support the students in learning the needed material efficiently. With a focus on real-world scenarios and innovative teaching activities integrating telemedicine devices and virtual professionals, SaNuRN is committed to enabling continuous learning for healthcare professionals in clinical practice. The SaNuRN team introduced new ways of evaluating healthcare professionals by shifting from a knowledge-based to a competencies-based evaluation, aligning with the Miller teaching pyramid and using the Objective Structured Clinical Examination and Script Concordance Test in digital health education. Drawing on the expertise of URN, CAU, and their public health and digital research laboratories and partners, the SaNuRN project represents a platform for continuous innovation, including telemedicine training and living labs with virtual and interactive professional activities. The SaNuRN project provides a comprehensive, personalized 30-hour training package for health and paramedical students, addressing all 70 FNRDH competencies. The program is enhanced using AI and NLP to create virtual patients and professionals for digital healthcare simulation. SaNuRN teaching materials are open-access. The project collaborates with academic institutions worldwide to develop educational material in digital health in English and multilingual formats. SaNuRN offers a practical and persuasive training approach to meet the current digital health education requirements.

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Theme Issue: ChatGPT and Generative Language Models in Medical Education

The deployment of OpenAI’s ChatGPT 3.5 and its subsequent versions, ChatGPT 4 and 4 with Vision (4V), has notably influenced the medical field. Demonstrating remarkable performance in medical exams globally, these models show potential for educational applications. However, their effectiveness in non-English contexts, particularly in Chile’s Medical Licensing Exam, a critical step for medical practitioners in Chile, is less explored. This gap highlights the need to evaluate ChatGPT’s adaptability to diverse linguistic and cultural contexts.

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Blended Learning

Generally, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills decline substantially over time. By combining web-based self-regulated learning with hands-on practice, blended training can be a time- and resource-efficient approach enabling individuals to acquire or refresh CPR skills at their convenience. However, few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of blended CPR refresher training compared with that of the traditional method.

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Student/Learners Perceptions and Experiences with Educational Technology

The growing presence of digital technologies in health care requires the health workforce to have proficiency in subjects such as informatics. This has implications in the education of nursing students, as their preparedness to use these technologies in clinical situations is something that course administrators need to consider. Thus, students’ attitudes toward technology could be investigated to assess their needs regarding this proficiency.

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Student/Learners Perceptions and Experiences with Educational Technology

Electrocardiography (ECG) interpretation is a fundamental skill for medical students and practicing medical professionals. Recognising ECG pathologies promptly allows for quick intervention, particularly important in the acute setting where urgent care may be needed. Despite its importance, many medical students find ECG interpretation and understanding of underlying pathology challenging, with teaching methods varying greatly. Therefore, this study involved the development of novel animations demonstrating the passage of electrical activity for well-described cardiac pathologies and showcased them alongside corresponding live ECG traces during an online tutorial for final-year medical students.

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Mobile Approaches to Medical Education

Carers often assume key roles in cancer care. However, many carers report feeling disempowered and ill‐equipped to support patients. Our group published evidence-based guidelines (the Triadic Oncology [TRIO] Guidelines) to improve oncology clinician engagement with carers and the management of challenging situations involving carers.

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Reviews in Medical Education

During health crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic, shortages of health care workers often occur. Recruiting students as volunteers could be an option, but it is uncertain whether the idea is well-accepted.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

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