JMIR Medical Education

Technology, innovation, and openness in medical education in the information age

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI


JMIR Medical Education (JME) is an open access, Pubmed-indexed, peer-reviewed journal with focus on technology, innovation and openess in medical education. Another focus is on how to train health professionals to use digital tools. We publish original research, reviews, viewpoint and policy papers on innovation and technology in medical education. As an open access journal we have special interest in open and free tools and digitial learning objects for medical education, and urge authors to make their tools and learning objects freely available (we may also publish them as Multimedia Appendix). We also invite submissions of non-conventional articles (eg, open medical education material and software resources that are not yet evaluated but free for others to use/implement). 

In our "Students' Corner", we invite students and trainees from various health professions to submit short essays and viewpoints on all aspects of medical education, but in particular suggestions on how to improve medical education, and suggestions for new technologies, applications and approaches (no article processing fees) are the main focuses.

Articles published in JME will be submitted to PubMed and Pubmed Central.

Recent Articles

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Social Media in Medical Education

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought virtual web-based learning to the forefront of medical education as training programs adapt to physical distancing challenges while maintaining the rigorous standards of medical training. Social media has unique and partially untapped potential to supplement formal medical education.

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Reviews in Medical Education

Existing research on the costs associated with the design and deployment of eLearning in health professions education is limited. The relative costs of these learning platforms to those of face-to-face learning are also not well understood. The lack of predefined costing models used for eLearning cost data capture has made it difficult to complete cost evaluation.

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Health Professionals' Training in eHealth, Digital Medicine, Medical Informatics

Accurate data retrieval is an essential part of patient care in the intensive care unit (ICU). The electronic health record (EHR) is the primary method for data storage and data review. We previously reported that residents participating in EHR-based simulations have varied and nonstandard approaches to finding data in the ICU, with subsequent errors in recognizing patient safety issues. We hypothesized that a novel EHR simulation-based training exercise would decrease EHR use variability among intervention interns, irrespective of prior EHR experience.

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Health Professionals' Training in eHealth, Digital Medicine, Medical Informatics

The adoption rate of digital health in the health care sector is low in many countries. A facilitating factor for successful implementation and adoption of digital health is acceptance by current and future health care professionals.

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Evaluation of Medical Education

Simulation-based training is a common strategy for improving the quality of facility-based maternity services and is often evaluated using Kirkpatrick’s theoretical model. The results on the Kirkpatrick levels are closely related to the quality of the instructional design of a training program. The instructional design is generally defined as the “set of prescriptions for teaching methods to improve the quality of instruction with a goal of optimizing learning outcomes.”

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Mobile Approaches to Medical Education

Mobile learning has become an essential instruction platform in many schools, colleges, universities, and various other educational institutions across the globe, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic crisis. The resulting severe, pandemic-related circumstances have disrupted physical and face-to-face contact teaching practices, thereby requiring many students to actively use mobile technologies for learning. Mobile learning technologies offer viable web-based teaching and learning platforms that are accessible to teachers and learners worldwide.

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Simulation

The collaborative clinical simulation (CCS) model is a structured method for the development and assessment of clinical competencies through small groups working collaboratively in simulated environments. From 2016 onward, the CCS model has been applied successfully among undergraduate and graduate medical students from the Universidad de Talca, Chile; the Universität de Barcelona, Spain; and the Universidad de Vic-Manresa, Spain. All the templates for building the clinical cases and the assessment instruments with CCS were printed on paper. Considering the large number of CCS sessions and the number of participating students that are required throughout the medical degree curriculum, it is impossible to keep an organized record when the instruments are printed on paper. Moreover, with the COVID-19 pandemic, web platforms have become important as safe training environments for students and medical faculties; this new educational environment should include the consolidation and adaptation of didactic sessions that create and use available virtual cases and use different web platforms.

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Social Media in Medical Education

Twitter is a rapidly growing social media site that has greatly integrated itself in the lives of students and professionals in the medical field. While Twitter has been found to be very helpful in facilitating education, there is also great potential for its usage as a social support system. Social support has become more essential as society grapples with declining mental health, particularly in the medical sector. In our previous paper, we saw that Twitter provides a promising tool to learn more about the online conversation about dementia and, in particular, the supportive network that can be created. Inspired by this, we decided to investigate the potential of using Twitter as a support system for students and professionals in the medical field. In this paper, we explore the current state of mental health in the medical field and suggest practical implementation methods for using Twitter.

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Evaluation of Medical Education

In 2014, Kenya’s Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP) initiated a 3-month field-based frontline training, Field Epidemiology Training Program (FETP-F), for local public health workers.

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Quality of Medical Educational and Instructional Material

Allergic rhinitis is a common disorder affecting both children and adults. Recommended treatment consists of intranasal corticosteroid spray administration, but only few patients administer the nasal spray in the correct technical manner. A wrong administration technique may result in side effects and affect the efficacy and adherence, thus making accurate administration instructions indispensable. Unfortunately, information about intranasal drug administration is generally not explained accurately, thereby leading to confusion among patients and inaccuracy in the self-administration of drugs.

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New Methods and Approaches in Medical Education

The notion of anytime, anyplace communication is characteristic of the current generation of learners. Such communications have facilitated the growth and integration of a blended or hybrid learning platform in multiple educational settings. However, there are limited reports on the use of an anytime, anyplace communication platform in clinical inpatient medical education.

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Continuing Medical Education (CME) for Doctors

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting up to 5% of children and adults. Undiagnosed and untreated ADHD can result in adverse long-term health, educational, and social impacts for affected individuals. Therefore, it is important to identify this disorder as early as possible. General practitioners (GPs) frequently play a gatekeeper role in access to specialist services in charge of diagnosis and treatment. Studies have shown that their lack of knowledge and understanding about ADHD can create barriers to care.

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