JMIR Medical Education

Technology, innovation, and openness in medical education in the information age

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI, Founding Editor and Publisher; Adjunct Professor, School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria, Canada


Impact Factor 3.6

JMIR Medical Education (JME, ISSN: 2369-3762, Impact Factor 3.6) is an open access, PubMed-indexed, peer-reviewed journal focusing on technology, innovation, and openness in medical education.This includes e-learning and virtual training, which has gained critical relevance in the (post-)COVID world. Another focus is on how to train health professionals to use digital tools. We publish original research, reviews, viewpoint, and policy papers on innovation and technology in medical education. As an open access journal, we have a special interest in open and free tools and digital learning objects for medical education and urge authors to make their tools and learning objects freely available (we may also publish them as a Multimedia Appendix). We also invite submissions of non-conventional articles (e.g., open medical education material and software resources that are not yet evaluated but free for others to use/implement). 

In our "Students' Corner," we invite students and trainees from various health professions to submit short essays and viewpoints on all aspects of medical education, particularly suggestions on improving medical education and suggestions for new technologies, applications, and approaches. 

In 2023, JMIR Medical Education received an inaugural Journal Impact Factor™ of 3.6 (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2023). The journal is indexed in MEDLINE, PubMed, PubMed Central, Scopus, DOAJ, and the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate).

Recent Articles

Article Thumbnail
Testing and Assessment in Medical Education

Medical students in Japan undergo a 2-year postgraduate residency program to acquire clinical knowledge and general medical skills. The General Medicine In-Training Examination (GM-ITE) assesses postgraduate residents’ clinical knowledge. A clinical simulation video (CSV) may assess learners’ interpersonal abilities.

|
Article Thumbnail
Theme Issue: ChatGPT and Generative Language Models in Medical Education

Achieving physical activity (PA) guidelines’ recommendation of 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous PA per week has been shown to reduce the risk of many chronic conditions. Despite the overwhelming evidence in this field, PA levels remain low globally. By creating engaging mobile health (mHealth) interventions through strategies such as just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs) that are tailored to an individual’s dynamic state, there is potential to increase PA levels. However, generating personalized content can take a long time due to various versions of content required for the personalization algorithms. ChatGPT presents an incredible opportunity to rapidly produce tailored content; however, there is a lack of studies exploring its feasibility.

|
Article Thumbnail
Professional Identity Development

Previous studies have predominantly measured e-professionalism through perceptions or attitudes, yet there exists no validated measure specifically targeting the actual behaviors of health care professionals (HCPs) in this realm. This study addresses this gap by constructing a normative framework, drawing from 3 primary sources to define e-professional behavior across 6 domains. Four domains pertain to the dangers of social networking sites (SNSs), encompassing confidentiality, privacy, patient interaction, and equitable resource allocation. Meanwhile, 2 domains focus on the opportunities of SNSs, namely, the proactive dissemination of public health information and maintaining scientific integrity.

|
Article Thumbnail
Theme Issue: ChatGPT and Generative Language Models in Medical Education

The communication gap between patients and health care professionals has led to increased disputes and resource waste in the medical domain. The development of artificial intelligence and other technologies brings new possibilities to solve this problem. This viewpoint paper proposes a new relationship between patients and health care professionals—“shared decision-making”—allowing both sides to obtain a deeper understanding of the disease and reach a consensus during diagnosis and treatment. Then, this paper discusses the important impact of ChatGPT-like solutions in treating rheumatoid arthritis using methotrexate from clinical and patient perspectives. For clinical professionals, ChatGPT-like solutions could provide support in disease diagnosis, treatment, and clinical trials, but attention should be paid to privacy, confidentiality, and regulatory norms. For patients, ChatGPT-like solutions allow easy access to massive amounts of information; however, the information should be carefully managed to ensure safe and effective care. To ensure the effective application of ChatGPT-like solutions in improving the relationship between patients and health care professionals, it is essential to establish a comprehensive database and provide legal, ethical, and other support. Above all, ChatGPT-like solutions could benefit patients and health care professionals if they ensure evidence-based solutions and data protection and collaborate with regulatory authorities and regulatory evolution.

|
Article Thumbnail
Research Letter

Our research letter investigates the potential, as well as the current limitations, of widely available text-to-image tools in generating images for medical education. We focused on illustrations of important physical signs in the face (for which confidentiality issues in conventional patient photograph use may be a particular concern) that medics should know about, and we used facial images of hypothyroidism and Horner syndrome as examples.

|
Article Thumbnail
Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Medical Education

Large language models (LLMs) have revolutionized natural language processing with their ability to generate human-like text through extensive training on large data sets. These models, including Generative Pre-trained Transformers (GPT)-3.5 (OpenAI), GPT-4 (OpenAI), and Bard (Google LLC), find applications beyond natural language processing, attracting interest from academia and industry. Students are actively leveraging LLMs to enhance learning experiences and prepare for high-stakes exams, such as the National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET) in India.

|
Article Thumbnail
Undergraduate Education for Allied Health Professionals

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an important aspect of the health care education curriculum. EBP involves following the 5 EBP steps: ask, assess, appraise, apply, and audit. These 5 steps reflect the suggested core competencies covered in teaching and learning programs to support future health care professionals applying EBP. When implementing EBP teaching, assessing outcomes by documenting the student’s performance and skills is relevant. This can be done using mobile devices.

|
Article Thumbnail
Graduate and Postgraduate Education for Health Professionals

The key to the digital leveling-up strategy of the National Health Service is the development of a digitally proficient leadership. The National Health Service Digital Academy (NHSDA) Digital Health Leadership program was designed to support emerging digital leaders to acquire the necessary skills to facilitate transformation. This study examined the influence of the program on professional identity formation as a means of creating a more proficient digital health leadership.

|
Article Thumbnail
Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Medical Education

Artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) are poised to have a substantial impact in the health care space. While a plethora of web-based resources exist to teach programming skills and ML model development, there are few introductory curricula specifically tailored to medical students without a background in data science or programming. Programs that do exist are often restricted to a specific specialty.

|
Article Thumbnail
New Methods and Approaches in Medical Education

Immersive virtual reality (IVR)–assisted experiential learning has the potential to foster empathy among undergraduate health care students toward older adults with cognitive impairment by facilitating a sense of embodiment. However, the extent of its effectiveness, including enhancing students’ learning experiences and achieving intended learning outcomes, remains underexplored.

|
Article Thumbnail
Theme Issue: ChatGPT and Generative Language Models in Medical Education

Patients with rare and complex diseases often experience delayed diagnoses and misdiagnoses because comprehensive knowledge about these diseases is limited to only a few medical experts. In this context, large language models (LLMs) have emerged as powerful knowledge aggregation tools with applications in clinical decision support and education domains.

|
Article Thumbnail
Theme Issue: ChatGPT and Generative Language Models in Medical Education

The use of mobile devices for delivering health-related services (mobile health [mHealth]) has rapidly increased, leading to a demand for summarizing the state of the art and practice through systematic reviews. However, the systematic review process is a resource-intensive and time-consuming process. Generative artificial intelligence (AI) has emerged as a potential solution to automate tedious tasks.

|

We are working in partnership with